WID Teaching Awards

 

A faculty recipient of the WID Awards stands on stage holding his award plaque

Presentation of awards at the WID Awards Ceremony

The University Writing Program honors faculty members and graduate teaching assistants each year who have demonstrated excellence in teaching and planning Writing in the Disciplines (WID) courses.

In addition to faculty awards, the program also recognizes student achievements with the annual Julian Clement Chase Prize.

Questions about WID Awards? Please email Randi Kristensen.

 


In the Spirit of Joseph P. Dymond

Joseph P. Dymond

 

 

As of 2020, the University Writing Program renames its university-wide Writing in the Disciplines faculty teaching award to honor the memory of Joseph P. Dymond (February 9, 1965-January 18, 2019). Professor Dymond arrived at GW in 2002 and engaged hundreds of students over the years in critical writing and thinking in geography. Carrying his mission beyond the classroom, he helped the department launch YouthMappers, an international organization of students using open-source mapping to address humanitarian crises.

One of his former students attested that “Professor Dymond invested in me beyond my academic career. Every meeting began with questions about how I was doing, and I know that these answers mattered just as much to him as those that dealt with the progress of my research.” And when it came down to advising academic work, this student reflected that “conversations with Professor Dymond about a research topic were best described as adrenalizing. When I returned to my desk after such a discussion, I always felt like I was writing with Professor Dymond rather than writing for him.” His teaching earned him the 2006 Morton A. Bender Teaching Award for instructional excellence, the 2010 Service Excellence Student Choice Award, the 2012 Writing in the Disciplines Distinguished Teaching Award, and a 2013 appointment to the GW Academy of Distinguished Teachers.

And so, in memory of our friend and colleague, we present the Joseph P. Dymond Writing in the Disciplines Distinguished Teaching Award. May it honor WID teaching where students feel they are writing with us rather than for us. 

 


Award Categories

 

Joseph P. Dymond WID Distinguished Teaching Award

This award recognizes a faculty member who has demonstrated dedication, excellence and innovation in the teaching of Writing in the Disciplines courses.

 

Best Assignment Design Award

This award recognizes excellence in assignment design and implementation. Faculty are eligible.

 

Distinguished Graduate Student Award

This award recognizes outstanding contributions by graduate students to the teaching of writing at GW, either as a graduate assistant or as instructor of record.

 


Criteria

 

Dymond Teaching Award and Best Assignment Design Award

  • The applicant must have taught at least three complete semesters of WID.
  • The design of the applicant’s WID course(s) must reflect an informed pedagogical concern with the development of students’ capacities as writers within a particular disciplinary context (including, where appropriate and relevant, their capacity to do independent research).
  • Special consideration will be given to innovative course or assignment design that provides students with substantive opportunities to practice the modes and methods of writing in the relevant discipline/field.

 

Distinguished Graduate Student Award

  • The applicant must have taught at least two complete semesters of WID.
  • The applicant’s contribution to the WID course(s) and/or WID in their teaching or home department must reflect an informed pedagogical concern with the development of students’ capacities as writers within a particular disciplinary context (including, where appropriate and relevant, their capacity to do independent research).
  • Special consideration will be given to innovative course or assignment design that provides students with especially substantive opportunities to practice the modes and methods of writing in the relevant discipline/field.

 


How to Nominate Awardees

WID awardees are determined by nominations from faculty and administration. Any faculty member is welcome to nominate another faculty member or GA for an award.

All nomination materials should be submitted electronically as a single PDF to [email protected] with subject “LastName FirstName - WID Award Application Packet [year].” Please name your PDF file using this standard as well.

To nominate a faculty member for a WID award, please compile:

  1. A letter of support (1 page) from the applicant’s administrator (the department chair, in the case of faculty nominees, or a director of graduate studies or faculty advisor, in the case of GAs) summarizing the case for the applicant. This letter should explain the applicant's contributions to the department's WID curriculum.
  2. A letter of application (1-2 pages) that addresses how the applicant uses appropriate pedagogical principles and effective teaching practices to teach writing in the specific discipline or area being taught. Include how assignments reflect these principles and elicit high achievement from student writers (including, where appropriate and relevant, their capacity to do independent research).
  3. A copy of the applicant’s C.V.
  4. Copies of relevant course materials. These should include, at a minimum, course syllabi and major assignments.
  5. Sample student writing projects from the applicant’s WID courses. Two samples should suffice.
  6. Names and emails of 5-10 students who could write a letter in support of the nomination. The selection committee will make direct contact with the students.
  7. Any additional evidence of teaching effectiveness and contribution to department or WID program.
  8. The entire dossier should not exceed 40 pages, and should be submitted as a single PDF. Material beyond the 40-page limit will not be considered. Letters need not be on letterhead nor signed by hand; typed signatures are acceptable but must be accompanied with complete contact information in the letter.

To nominate a graduate student for a WID award, please compile:

  1. A letter of support (1 page) from a program chair or director of graduate studies summarizing the case for the applicant. This letter should explain the applicant's contributions to the department's WID curriculum.
  2. An unofficial transcript of graduate work. 
  3. A letter of application (1-2 pages) that addresses how the applicant uses appropriate pedagogical principles and effective teaching practices to teach writing in the specific discipline or area being taught. Include how assignments reflect these principles and elicit high achievement from student writers (including, where appropriate and relevant, their capacity to do independent research).
  4. A copy of the applicant’s C.V.
  5. Copies of relevant course materials. These should include, at a minimum, course syllabi and major assignments.
  6. Sample student writing projects from the applicant’s WID courses. Two samples should suffice.
  7. Names and emails of 5-10 students who could write a letter in support of the nomination. The selection committee will make direct contact with the students.
  8. Any additional evidence of teaching effectiveness and contribution to department or WID program.
  9. The entire dossier should not exceed 40 pages, and should be submitted as a single PDF. Material beyond the 40-page limit will not be considered. Letters need not be on letterhead nor signed by hand; typed signatures are acceptable but must be accompanied with complete contact information in the letter.

 


Past Recipients

2021

  • The Joseph P. Dymond WID Distinguished Teaching Award: Shelley Brundage, Professor, Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences
  • Distinguished Assignment Design Award: Melissa Keeley, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Public Policy, & Public Administration
  • Distinguished Graduate Student Teaching Award: Kelsie Pos, PhD Candidate, Department of Biological Sciences

2020

  • The Joseph P. Dymond WID Distinguished Teaching Award: L. Patricia Hernandez, Professor, Department of Biological Sciences
  • Distinguished Assignment Design Award: LaKeisha McClary, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry
  • Distinguished Graduate Student Teaching Award: Joshua Sparks, PhD Candidate, Department of Statistics

2019

  • Distinguished Teaching Award: Murray Snyder, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and international affairs
  • Best Syllabus Design Award: Jocelyne Brant, assistant professor of French
  • Distinguished Graduate Student Teaching Award: Joshua Benson, Department of English
  • Video: 2019 Winners

2018

  • Distinguished Teaching Award: Tyler Anbinder, Department of History
  • Best Assignment Design Award: Kimberly Morgan, Department of Political Science
  • Distinguished Graduate Student Teaching Award: Alyssa Poblete, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences
  • Video: 2018 Winners

2017

  • Distinguished Teaching Award: Royce A. Francis, assistant professor of engineering management and systems engineering
  • Best Assignment Design Award: Mary Buckley, director of the Elizabeth J. Sommers Women’s Leadership Program and associate professor of dance
  • Distinguished Graduate Student Teaching Award: Alan Montroso, Department of English

2016

  • Distinguished Teaching Award: Christopher Klemek, Department of History
  • Best Assignment Design Award: Daniel DeWispelare, Department of English
  • Distinguished Graduate Student Teaching Award: Victoria Barnett-Woods, Department of English

2015

  • Distinguished Teaching Award: Kathryn Kleppinger, French and francophone studies; Department of Romance, German, and Slavic Languages
  • Best Assignment Design Award: Oya Altinkilic, Department of Finance
  • Distinguished Graduate Student Teaching Award: Dorothy Smith Ohl, Department of Political Science

2014

  • Distinguished Teaching Award: Yongsheng Leng, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  • Best Assignment Design Award: Edward Cherian, School of Business

2013

  • Distinguished Teaching Award: Jonathan Hsy, Department of English
  • Best Assignment Design Award: Catherine Woytowicz, Elliott School of International Affairs
  • Honorable Mention: Michele Clark, Elliott School of International Affairs

2012

  • Distinguished Teaching Award: Joseph Dymond, Department of Geography
  • Best Assignment Design Award: Shelley Brundage, Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences
  • Honorable Mention: Steve Balla, Department of Political Science

2011

  • Distinguished Teaching Award: Lowell Abrams, Department of Mathematics
  • Best Assignment Design Award: Rebecca Katz, Milken Institute School of Public Health